Treat Your Sweetheart

Local Sweet Grass Co-op Filet Mignon, Wrapped in Beeler's Bacon

Enjoy nothing but the best this Valentine’s Day with 100% Grass-Fed Filet Mignon wrapped in deliciously thick cut hickory smoked Beeler’ Bacon.

Donate-a-Dime Organization of the Month: Los Alamos Study Group

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The Los Alamos Study Group first began meeting in Los Alamos in 1989 and formally organized as a non-profit in 1992. We are primarily an investigative, research and education organization working on nuclear weapons, climate, and energy policy. We place particular emphasis on the education and training of young activists and scholars.

We primarily work with Congress, its investigative agencies, the Department of Energy (DOE), and other parts of the Executive Branch. We also work to inform the diplomatic community at the UN and elsewhere. Our careful, reasoned approach has gained us many friends and built bridges even with people in the nuclear labs and plants. Since September 11, 2001, our work has increasingly placed nuclear weapons in the context of aggression abroad and the militarization of our society at home.

Domestically, our primary goal is to help national decision makers develop budgets and plans that reflect a necessary rapid transformation in DOE’s mission, focusing in particular on DOE’s nuclear labs. DOE planning and budgeting must include dramatically greater funding in renewable energy and allied fields while protecting the environment, bolstering our lagging economy, and providing clear signals to private investors that will engage them as partners in building a sustainable society. These budgetary policies must be sound regional policies as well, and they must be politically practical, not just throwaway gestures.

Obama’s nuclear weapons plans and programs are expected to cost at least $1 trillion over the next 30 years, or more. It is significantly more than current Department of Defense (DoD) and DOE nuclear spending. Full funding to replace the entire nuclear arsenal—Obama’s plan—implies further re-balancing of US priorities away from society and the environment, toward the military and the corporate nuclear complex.

Our nuclear missiles and bombs are militarily useless, but they have powerful domestic roles. They shape our politics, nationally and especially in New Mexico.

These investments undermine our own social contract, the morality and coherence of our own foreign policy, and our willingness to address the real problems we face. We can help bring some awareness, perhaps a critical part, given the centrality of New Mexico and the national labs located here. We need to work together, now more than ever. This year and the next will be crucial.

We hope that you will bring a bag and donate your dimes to help forward work on weapons, climate and energy issues and address the many problems we face. Please don’t hesitate to contact us at twm@lasg.org or gmello@lasg.org or go to our website at www.lasg.org and sign up for our news bulletins or make a donation.

Westside Best of 2015 Sale

Westside's best sellers of 2015 are on sale now!

Stop by our Westside store and check out these fabulous deals on our 2015 Best Sellers. You don’t want to miss picking up some organic chicken, wild caught sockeye salmon or local cheese. Sale is on now through Saturday, January 16.

Sale includes Mary's organic chicken, wild sockeye salmon, local feta cheese and more.

Donate-a-Dime Organization of the Month: Leukemia and Lymphoma Society NM Chapter

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Every month, La Montañita sponsors a local community-based organization through our Donate-a-Dime bag program.

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) is the world’s largest voluntary health organization dedicated to funding blood cancer research, education and patient services. LLS’s mission is to cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease and myeloma, and to improve the quality of life of patients and their families. LLS created the Information Resource Center to provide blood cancer patients, their families and health professionals’ accurate, current disease information and support. In New Mexico, the money supports local research, patients and families.

In Fiscal Year 2015 (July 2014-June 2015) the New Mexico /El Paso Chapter in addition to funneling funds to research the New Mexico chapter provided co-pay assistance of $278,041 to 145 patients for treatment, offered four family support groups and matched patients with caregivers and responded to hundreds of inquiries for support and information.

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) sponsors free community-based education programs for patients, their families, caregivers and healthcare professionals. Local doctors and other healthcare professionals lead these programs providing information on treatment options, strengthening your decision-making and coping skills, manage treatment side effects and finding resources, including financial assistance.

Professional Education

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) sponsors a number of free community-based professional education programs for healthcare professionals, particularly for oncology nurses and social workers. Patients, their families and caregivers are also invited to attend. These programs are led by local doctors and other healthcare professionals and offer continuing education credits for nurses and social workers. Please call the New Mexico/El Paso Chapter for upcoming Professional Education Programs at (505) 872-0141 or (888) 286-7846.

Help the LLS help people with blood cancer and their families. Their dedicated community volunteers are the heart and soul of The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS). Volunteers can help with: school and youth programs, team trainings the Light the Night Walk Event, general office assistance and more. Or let the LLS know your area of expertise, such as public relations, marketing, finance, fundraising and event planning so they can connect you with the right volunteer opportunity.

There are many different ways you can participate in The New Mexico/El Paso Leukemia & Lymphoma Chapter and make a difference in the lives of those touched by blood cancer. The most immediate way this month is to bring your reusable shopping bag and in January Donate a Dime to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society.

For more information call 505-872-0141 or go to www.lls.org/new-mexico

Edited by Robin Seydel from information provided by the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society.

EDITORS NOTE: A review published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health on the relationship between pesticide exposure and the risk of blood lymphomas has confirmed the existence of a link with glyphosate commonly known as Roundup that is sprayed ubiquitously on all Monsanto produced GMO food crops as well as promoted to consumers for control of weeds in their gardens and around their homes.

The study “Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma and Occupational Exposure to Agricultural Pesticide Chemical Groups and Active Ingredients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis,” focused on systematic reviews and a series of meta-analysis of almost 30 years worth of epidemiological research on the relationship between glyphosate and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) recently determined that glyphosate is “probably carcinogenic to humans” (Group 2A).

2015 Patronage Dividend

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The La Montañita Co-op Board of Directors is pleased to announce a patronage refund in the total amount of $235,000. This represents 0.9% of member sales for the fiscal year ending August 31, 2015. Of that total, the Board has approved a cash refund to members of $110,000. This is 0.42% of total sales, and is also equal to last year’s refund of $110,000. The balance will be retained in member equity. The patronage refund is one of the main economic links between the Co-op and its members; the refund allows members to share in the financial health of the Co-op in proportion to their patronage.

Each Co-op member will receive a refund equaling 0.42% of her or his purchases from the Co-op during the past fiscal year in cash or store credit. Members can claim their cash or credit at the register at any La Montañita store (members who live outside of New Mexico will receive a check). This year, we sent out Patronage Certificates through both email and snail mail. If we have an email address on file for you, check your inbox. If we don’t, keep an eye on your mailbox.

There are a few different numbers listed in the Patronage Certificate, so here are some definitions that might help you understand what they all mean:
Patronage Certificate — your notification that the Co-op Board has declared a Patronage Dividend and what you as an owner will receive.

Purchase Total — your total purchases during the September 1, 2014 thru August 31,2015 fiscal year.

Allocation Paid — this year’s cash portion amount redeemable at any register of your total patronage refund.

Allocation Retained — the portion that you are reinvesting in this community owned business this year as determined by the Board of Directors.

Cumulative Allocation Paid — the amount that you as an owner have received in the cash portion of your Patronage Dividends over the duration of your ownership. If this amount equals the Allocation Paid column it means you are a new owner this fiscal year.

Cumulative Allocation Retained — the amount that you as an owner have reinvested in our community-owned cooperative over the lifetime of your ownership.
If you have a comment regarding the Board of Directors’ allocation decision, you can contact them at bod@lamontanita.coop. If you have a more general question about the Patronage Dividend or the redemption process, please contact the Membership Department either by sending an email to memb@lamontanita.coop or calling us at (505) 217-2027 or (505) 217-2016.

21st Annual Holiday Giving Tree

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Celebrating Over Two Decades of Sharing, Caring, and Cooperation for a Brighter Future

During each holiday season, Co-op members have shared resources and helped fulfill the holiday needs and wishes of children experiencing hardships in our communities for the last 21 years. Every year we ask for your help in letting some very special children and families know that we, as a community, despite tough economic times, will continue to be there for one another.

Through this program, we make the holiday wishes of approximately 600 children in protective custody and foster care a reality. Over the years, you, our loyal Co-op members and shoppers, our staff and child advocates from participating agencies have, through this program, provided for the needs of thousands of children. From the bottom of our hearts we thank you, and hope that you’ll be able to give a gift again this year!

How it Works

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  •  Sustainably grown and harvested trees (purchased from Delancy Street’s addiction recovery program) will go up at ALL Co-op locations December 1.
  • The ornaments have the name, age, and a holiday wish for each child, allowing you to choose a gift you will enjoy giving and they will enjoy receiving. Please put your name and ornament number on the sheets attached to the giving tree at each store in case you lose the ornament.
  • Please return the gifts to the Co-op by Monday, December 14 so we can get them back to the agencies and to the children in time. Please, please do honor this deadline.
  • Some families and foster families have more than one child in the program. When one child gets a gift and another does not (because an ornament is taken but a gift is not returned to the Co-op in time) it can be devastating for that child.
  • Please tape the “ornament” with the child’s name and agency onto the gift. To protect the confidentiality and the identities of the children, each ornament has a code on it. Taping the colored ornaments that have the agency name and an ornament code number to the top of the gift will help us get your gift to the right child.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, contact Robin at 505-217-2027, toll free at 877-775-2667, or e-mail her at robins@lamontanita.coop

Participating Agencies

Peanut Butter and Jelly Day School

For well over 40 years, PB&J Family Services, Inc. has been working to keep children safe and help families survive. PB&J continues to pioneer innovative approaches to the prevention of child abuse and neglect and the preservation of the family through interactive parenting and bonding programs in its Peanut Butter & Jelly Therapeutic Preschools, from their home-based programs and in their TEENS program at the Cuba, NM, High School — focusing on breaking the often generational cycle of family dysfunction.

In a program that serves children with an incarcerated parent at one of four New Mexico prisons, PB&J works to break the cycle of crime. Often angry and feeling abandoned, these children are six to eight times more likely to be imprisoned than other youngsters. Other programs work with middle and high school youth in the South Valley through the KidPACT program. More than 80 percent of the families PB&J works with make progress toward meeting their goals. Their programs are so successful with governmental support they are in the process of expanding to serve new communities.

Your gift helps them have a holiday season to remember. Mil gracias! For further information you may contact Donna Brew at (505) 877-7060 or visit pbjfamilyservices.org

Enlace Communitario

Enlace Comunitario (EC)’s works with Latino immigrants to eliminate domestic violence and strengthen the community. Over 15 years EC has created a dynamic continuum of services for both victims of domestic violence and their children including: safety planning; assessment; individual and group counseling; referrals to services (housing, health, financial, etc.); parenting and life-skills classes; legal advocacy; economic development, crisis intervention and community education. EC’s innovative approach goes beyond providing services to include advocacy, leadership development and community organizing projects to make long term systemic changes and strengthen the community.

Domestic violence affects families from all backgrounds. Unfortunately, women from immigrant communities are often at greater risk and are less likely to access needed services. They face cultural and language barriers to police and social services, increased threats of becoming separated from their children through deportation or international child abduction, less access to public benefits and less awareness of their plight by churches, schools and the community at large.

Please contact them at (505)246-8972 or at enlacenm.org with questions or if you want to support Enlace.

New Mexico Department of Children, Youth and Families

Bernalillo County Child Protective Services (CPS) is a division of the New Mexico’s Children Youth and Families Department (CYFD). CYFD receives hundreds of reports every month regarding abuse/neglect of children. And while the mainstream media reports the problems now and again, the thousands of children helped by CYFD generally goes unreported. Social workers investigate allegations and when needed intervene with families to ensure the safety of children. This intervention may consist of crisis counseling, referrals to community resources, or other community supports, or in worst case scenarios the Department requests custody of the children. Children in CYFD custody are placed in a licensed foster home.

Foster parents give temporary care to children while they are in CYFD custody providing a protective and safe home, structure, nurturing, and assistance in preparing the child to return to his/her home, or to be adopted. In New Mexico everyone, is mandated by law, to report child abuse, neglect or exploitation. To report child abuse or neglect please call: Metro Area, 841-6100 or Statewide, 1-800-797-3260.

Bernalillo County has a group of dedicated foster families, but the need is greater than the number of available families. If you feel you could provide a safe home for children in CYFD custody please call Foster a Future, at 1-800-432-2075, and visit cyfd.org to find out more. Working together we can make a difference in a child’s life.

New Mexico Kids Matter—Nobody deserves—or longs for—a happy holiday more than a child in foster care. There are close to one thousand children in foster care in Albuquerque. These are children who are in state’s custody through no fault of their own. This year New Mexico Kids Matter (CASA), a non-profit organization that trains community volunteers to advocate for children who are in foster care, are working with CYFD and are providing support to this agency.

All you need to do to be an elf is come into the Co-op pick an ornament, gather your family and have fun picking a present that will truly be appreciated. Please return your unwrapped gift by Dec. 14th. Every child is a profound responsibility to us all and we thank you for your generosity.

Blueberry Scones

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From Adrienne Weiss

These easy-to-prepare vegan blueberry scones make a great breakfast treat. Or, grab one or two when on-the-go. Yum!

Makes 10 scones

Time: 30 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups whole wheat spelt or whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/3 cup cold pressed oil
  • 1/3 cup plus 1/4 cup (for brushing) agave nectar
  • 1/4 cup cold water
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla
  • *1/2 cup blueberries

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper. Spray very lightly with oil.
  2. Place flour, baking powder and salt in a bowl and mix. Add oil, 1/3 cup agave nectar, water and vanilla and mix for 30 seconds. Gently fold in blueberries.
  3. Drop large spoonfuls of dough onto cookie sheet and bake for 9 minutes. Remove from oven and brush each scone with agave nectar. Continue to bake for an additional 8 minutes, until lightly golden.
  4. Allow to cool for a few minutes before serving. Enjoy!

*Frozen wild blueberries work beautifully when fresh berries are out of season.

You’re Invited

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Join us at all our Co-ops for holiday festivities, natural foods samplings, craft fairs, music, friends and fun! And don’t forget to take an ornament off our Make a Child Smile Holiday giving trees, up at all locations December 1,  and make the season brighter for a child in need.

Sunday, December 6: Nob Hill Co-op, 2-5pm

  • 2:00pm—Dean Gibson: eclectic tin hand drums
  • 2:30pm—The Loren Kahn Puppet and Object Theater (for children of all ages)
  • 3:00pm—Emily E. Erb and Friends: classic and seasonal clarinet and French horn duets
  • 3:30pm—The Loren Kahn Puppet and Object Theater (for children of all ages)
  • 4:00pm—Temporary Tattoos: folk acoustic

Saturday, December 12: Santa Fe Co-op, 12:30-3:30pm

  • 1:30–3:30pm—Brian Bennett and Catherine Donovan

Saturday, December 12: Valley Co-op, 2-5pm

  • 2:30pm—Dean Gibson: eclectic tin hand drums
  • 3:30pm—Mosaic Woodwind Trio: classic and seasonal

Saturday, December 19: Westside Co-op, 11am-4pm

  • 11:30am—Mosaic Woodwind Trio: classic, seasonal
  • 1:00pm— Zia Conservatory: folk, seasonal acoustic
  • 2:30pm—Jazz Brasileiro: Bossa Nova

Cast your Vote!

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Help pick the newest members of our Board of Directors! Now through November 14, voting is open in the Board elections. This is always an exciting time for La Montañita as Co-op owners exercise one of the many benefits of ownership through casting their vote, and also help to uphold the second of the seven cooperative principles: Democratic Member Control.

The Co-op is governed by a nine-person Board of Directors who each serve three-year terms. Each year the Co-op ownership normally elects three new board members, but this year it we have two additional Board positions open as well. You can learn more about the 2015 Board candidates here.

Your vote truly counts in this “one owner, one vote” democratic system, as the Board represents all the owners of the Co-op and as such is legally responsible for the operation of the business. The Board also works to form a vision to steer the Co-op into the future.

When you’re ready, visit our voting site to cast your ballot!

Donate-a-Dime Organization of the Month: Roadrunner Food Bank

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Every month, La Montañita sponsors a local community-based organization through our Donate-a-Dime bag program.

By Brian Brown, Roadrunner Food Bank

Hunger is a serious issue in New Mexico. According to Feeding America, one in five people is at risk of hunger. The situation for our children is much worse with nearly 30% or one in three children at risk of hunger.

For more than 35 years, Roadrunner Food Bank has been committed to solving hunger across our state. Every week, we provide enough food to reach 70,000 hungry people who worry and struggle to put enough food on the table throughout the month. More than half of the people in our food lines have someone employed in their household. The remaining are seniors and the disabled. Low wages force the poor into our food lines every month. The poor and hungry are hurt FIRST and worst during times of economic instability and make tough choices to survive.

Research shows there is a link between health and hunger. Hungry homes have a greater number of people who have high blood pressure, diabetes and general poor health. In 46% of households experiencing hunger have someone who is in “less than good” health. Another 25% of hungry households said they have a family member in “poor health.” In hungry homes, 75% report purchasing inexpensive unhealthy food as the most common way to have some food to eat at home.

Research shows that more than 63 million meals are missing from the plates of hungry people across our state. Year after year, we continue to increase our food distribution, but the meal gap is still very serious. For every meal we currently distribute, the meal gap suggests we need to be able to provide nearly two more.

HUNGER AFFECTS VULNERABLE PEOPLE

  • 89% of hungry households have a yearly income of less than $20,000
  • 68% of people we already serve plan to obtain food on a regular basis from the Food Bank and our network of partners
  • It is a myth that only the homeless need and seek help with food. Research shows that 89% of hungry people live in permanent housing such as a home or an apartment.
  • 57% report receiving SNAP benefits. Of those households, 94% said SNAP DID NOT last the entire month and must stand in a food line for help with food the rest of the month.

Roadrunner Food Bank is a distribution center supplying food to more than 500 partner agencies throughout the state and several regional food banks. The Food Bank also distributes food through direct service hunger programs. Two have recently been updated to increase the amount of food.

The Childhood Hunger and Senior Hunger Initiatives bring a combination of hunger-relief programs to schools, low-income senior housing sites, senior centers and other locations where people congregate to receive food on a regular basis. These initiatives allow us to t riple the amount of food going to vulnerable populations.

HELP SOLVE HUNGER!

Give. For every $1 you donate to the Food Bank, we are able to distribute five meals.

Volunteer. People from all walks of life are welcome to volunteer including families, schools, business, civic organizations, etc.

Online Food Drive. Host a food drive—virtually. Register a team at www.rrfb.org/ofd to start raising funds among friends, family and colleagues for the Food Bank.

Tour. Let us take you on a tour. Invite 5-10 people to join you.

Advocate. Contact us to learn about how you can help advocate to protect hunger programs in our country.

For More information or to make a donation go to www.rrfb.org