Have a Field Day Every Day!

Haven’t tried a Field Day product, yet? It’s La Montañita’s organic, natural and GMO-free value-product line.

As part of our Co+op Basics special-pricing program (look for the purple and white signs), we carry over 80 Field Day lines at everyday low prices store-wide at all your neighborhood La Montañita locations.

Stop by today, and pick up some Field Day that’s designed to fit YOUR budget.

To learn more about Field Day and their extensive selection of products, visit their website: http://www.fielddayproducts.com/

Marshall Kovitz

Our beloved founding owner and Board Member passed away peacefully on Saturday, March 26. We are deeply indebted to Marshall for his unwavering guidance, loyalty and dedication to La Montañita for the past 40 years in all aspects of the Co-op, especially with governance issues. Marshall truly embodied the cooperative spirit and was an inspiration to us all. He will be greatly missed.

Require GMO Labeling

By U.S. Senator Martin Heinrich

Like parents across New Mexico, knowing what’s in the food I buy for my family is important to me. This is one of the main reasons why I think it’s so important that Congress act to require products sold in grocery stores to be clearly labeled if they are genetically modified. Providing transparency to consumers will ensure they are able to make informed decisions about the food they purchase.

The federal government requires labeling of concentrated orange juice, after all.  Doesn’t everyone have the right to know what’s in their food?

I have cosponsored the Biotechnology Food Labeling Uniformity Act to make sure consumers can find genetically modified organism (GMO) ingredient labeling on food packaging. The legislation presents an alternative to a Senate Agriculture Committee bill being debated on the floor this week that would prohibit states from implementing GMO labeling laws.

A commitment to strengthen our agriculture industry also requires a commitment to our consumers, which is why we need a uniform federal GMO labeling standard.

Americans deserve to know exactly what’s in the food they purchase at the grocery store. I will continue to fight for clear and accurate labeling of food products so we can all make more informed decisions about the foods we are feeding our families.

Listening to the needs and voices of all constituents is key to building a better New Mexico. I encourage you to share your comments, suggestions, and questions. Please contact me any time I can be of assistance to you and your family.

Treat Your Sweetheart

Enjoy nothing but the best this Valentine’s Day with 100% Grass-Fed Filet Mignon wrapped in deliciously thick cut hickory smoked Beeler’ Bacon.

Donate-a-Dime Organization of the Month: Los Alamos Study Group

The Los Alamos Study Group first began meeting in Los Alamos in 1989 and formally organized as a non-profit in 1992. We are primarily an investigative, research and education organization working on nuclear weapons, climate, and energy policy. We place particular emphasis on the education and training of young activists and scholars.

We primarily work with Congress, its investigative agencies, the Department of Energy (DOE), and other parts of the Executive Branch. We also work to inform the diplomatic community at the UN and elsewhere. Our careful, reasoned approach has gained us many friends and built bridges even with people in the nuclear labs and plants. Since September 11, 2001, our work has increasingly placed nuclear weapons in the context of aggression abroad and the militarization of our society at home.

Domestically, our primary goal is to help national decision makers develop budgets and plans that reflect a necessary rapid transformation in DOE’s mission, focusing in particular on DOE’s nuclear labs. DOE planning and budgeting must include dramatically greater funding in renewable energy and allied fields while protecting the environment, bolstering our lagging economy, and providing clear signals to private investors that will engage them as partners in building a sustainable society. These budgetary policies must be sound regional policies as well, and they must be politically practical, not just throwaway gestures.

Obama’s nuclear weapons plans and programs are expected to cost at least $1 trillion over the next 30 years, or more. It is significantly more than current Department of Defense (DoD) and DOE nuclear spending. Full funding to replace the entire nuclear arsenal—Obama’s plan—implies further re-balancing of US priorities away from society and the environment, toward the military and the corporate nuclear complex.

Our nuclear missiles and bombs are militarily useless, but they have powerful domestic roles. They shape our politics, nationally and especially in New Mexico.

These investments undermine our own social contract, the morality and coherence of our own foreign policy, and our willingness to address the real problems we face. We can help bring some awareness, perhaps a critical part, given the centrality of New Mexico and the national labs located here. We need to work together, now more than ever. This year and the next will be crucial.

We hope that you will bring a bag and donate your dimes to help forward work on weapons, climate and energy issues and address the many problems we face. Please don’t hesitate to contact us at twm@lasg.org or gmello@lasg.org or go to our website at www.lasg.org and sign up for our news bulletins or make a donation.

Westside Best of 2015 Sale

Stop by our Westside store and check out these fabulous deals on our 2015 Best Sellers. You don’t want to miss picking up some organic chicken, wild caught sockeye salmon or local cheese. Sale is on now through Saturday, January 16.

Sale includes Mary's organic chicken, wild sockeye salmon, local feta cheese and more.

Donate-a-Dime Organization of the Month: Leukemia and Lymphoma Society NM Chapter

Every month, La Montañita sponsors a local community-based organization through our Donate-a-Dime bag program.

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) is the world’s largest voluntary health organization dedicated to funding blood cancer research, education and patient services. LLS’s mission is to cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease and myeloma, and to improve the quality of life of patients and their families. LLS created the Information Resource Center to provide blood cancer patients, their families and health professionals’ accurate, current disease information and support. In New Mexico, the money supports local research, patients and families.

In Fiscal Year 2015 (July 2014-June 2015) the New Mexico /El Paso Chapter in addition to funneling funds to research the New Mexico chapter provided co-pay assistance of $278,041 to 145 patients for treatment, offered four family support groups and matched patients with caregivers and responded to hundreds of inquiries for support and information.

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) sponsors free community-based education programs for patients, their families, caregivers and healthcare professionals. Local doctors and other healthcare professionals lead these programs providing information on treatment options, strengthening your decision-making and coping skills, manage treatment side effects and finding resources, including financial assistance.

Professional Education

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) sponsors a number of free community-based professional education programs for healthcare professionals, particularly for oncology nurses and social workers. Patients, their families and caregivers are also invited to attend. These programs are led by local doctors and other healthcare professionals and offer continuing education credits for nurses and social workers. Please call the New Mexico/El Paso Chapter for upcoming Professional Education Programs at (505) 872-0141 or (888) 286-7846.

Help the LLS help people with blood cancer and their families. Their dedicated community volunteers are the heart and soul of The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS). Volunteers can help with: school and youth programs, team trainings the Light the Night Walk Event, general office assistance and more. Or let the LLS know your area of expertise, such as public relations, marketing, finance, fundraising and event planning so they can connect you with the right volunteer opportunity.

There are many different ways you can participate in The New Mexico/El Paso Leukemia & Lymphoma Chapter and make a difference in the lives of those touched by blood cancer. The most immediate way this month is to bring your reusable shopping bag and in January Donate a Dime to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society.

For more information call 505-872-0141 or go to www.lls.org/new-mexico

Edited by Robin Seydel from information provided by the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society.

EDITORS NOTE: A review published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health on the relationship between pesticide exposure and the risk of blood lymphomas has confirmed the existence of a link with glyphosate commonly known as Roundup that is sprayed ubiquitously on all Monsanto produced GMO food crops as well as promoted to consumers for control of weeds in their gardens and around their homes.

The study “Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma and Occupational Exposure to Agricultural Pesticide Chemical Groups and Active Ingredients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis,” focused on systematic reviews and a series of meta-analysis of almost 30 years worth of epidemiological research on the relationship between glyphosate and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) recently determined that glyphosate is “probably carcinogenic to humans” (Group 2A).

Blueberry Scones

From Adrienne Weiss

These easy-to-prepare vegan blueberry scones make a great breakfast treat. Or, grab one or two when on-the-go. Yum!

Makes 10 scones

Time: 30 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups whole wheat spelt or whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/3 cup cold pressed oil
  • 1/3 cup plus 1/4 cup (for brushing) agave nectar
  • 1/4 cup cold water
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla
  • *1/2 cup blueberries

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper. Spray very lightly with oil.
  2. Place flour, baking powder and salt in a bowl and mix. Add oil, 1/3 cup agave nectar, water and vanilla and mix for 30 seconds. Gently fold in blueberries.
  3. Drop large spoonfuls of dough onto cookie sheet and bake for 9 minutes. Remove from oven and brush each scone with agave nectar. Continue to bake for an additional 8 minutes, until lightly golden.
  4. Allow to cool for a few minutes before serving. Enjoy!

*Frozen wild blueberries work beautifully when fresh berries are out of season.

You’re Invited

Join us at all our Co-ops for holiday festivities, natural foods samplings, craft fairs, music, friends and fun! And don’t forget to take an ornament off our Make a Child Smile Holiday giving trees, up at all locations December 1,  and make the season brighter for a child in need.

Sunday, December 6: Nob Hill Co-op, 2-5pm

  • 2:00pm—Dean Gibson: eclectic tin hand drums
  • 2:30pm—The Loren Kahn Puppet and Object Theater (for children of all ages)
  • 3:00pm—Emily E. Erb and Friends: classic and seasonal clarinet and French horn duets
  • 3:30pm—The Loren Kahn Puppet and Object Theater (for children of all ages)
  • 4:00pm—Temporary Tattoos: folk acoustic

Saturday, December 12: Santa Fe Co-op, 12:30-3:30pm

  • 1:30–3:30pm—Brian Bennett and Catherine Donovan

Saturday, December 12: Valley Co-op, 2-5pm

  • 2:30pm—Dean Gibson: eclectic tin hand drums
  • 3:30pm—Mosaic Woodwind Trio: classic and seasonal

Saturday, December 19: Westside Co-op, 11am-4pm

  • 11:30am—Mosaic Woodwind Trio: classic, seasonal
  • 1:00pm— Zia Conservatory: folk, seasonal acoustic
  • 2:30pm—Jazz Brasileiro: Bossa Nova

Donate-a-Dime Organization of the Month: Roadrunner Food Bank

Every month, La Montañita sponsors a local community-based organization through our Donate-a-Dime bag program.

By Brian Brown, Roadrunner Food Bank

Hunger is a serious issue in New Mexico. According to Feeding America, one in five people is at risk of hunger. The situation for our children is much worse with nearly 30% or one in three children at risk of hunger.

For more than 35 years, Roadrunner Food Bank has been committed to solving hunger across our state. Every week, we provide enough food to reach 70,000 hungry people who worry and struggle to put enough food on the table throughout the month. More than half of the people in our food lines have someone employed in their household. The remaining are seniors and the disabled. Low wages force the poor into our food lines every month. The poor and hungry are hurt FIRST and worst during times of economic instability and make tough choices to survive.

Research shows there is a link between health and hunger. Hungry homes have a greater number of people who have high blood pressure, diabetes and general poor health. In 46% of households experiencing hunger have someone who is in “less than good” health. Another 25% of hungry households said they have a family member in “poor health.” In hungry homes, 75% report purchasing inexpensive unhealthy food as the most common way to have some food to eat at home.

Research shows that more than 63 million meals are missing from the plates of hungry people across our state. Year after year, we continue to increase our food distribution, but the meal gap is still very serious. For every meal we currently distribute, the meal gap suggests we need to be able to provide nearly two more.

HUNGER AFFECTS VULNERABLE PEOPLE

  • 89% of hungry households have a yearly income of less than $20,000
  • 68% of people we already serve plan to obtain food on a regular basis from the Food Bank and our network of partners
  • It is a myth that only the homeless need and seek help with food. Research shows that 89% of hungry people live in permanent housing such as a home or an apartment.
  • 57% report receiving SNAP benefits. Of those households, 94% said SNAP DID NOT last the entire month and must stand in a food line for help with food the rest of the month.

Roadrunner Food Bank is a distribution center supplying food to more than 500 partner agencies throughout the state and several regional food banks. The Food Bank also distributes food through direct service hunger programs. Two have recently been updated to increase the amount of food.

The Childhood Hunger and Senior Hunger Initiatives bring a combination of hunger-relief programs to schools, low-income senior housing sites, senior centers and other locations where people congregate to receive food on a regular basis. These initiatives allow us to t riple the amount of food going to vulnerable populations.

HELP SOLVE HUNGER!

Give. For every $1 you donate to the Food Bank, we are able to distribute five meals.

Volunteer. People from all walks of life are welcome to volunteer including families, schools, business, civic organizations, etc.

Online Food Drive. Host a food drive—virtually. Register a team at www.rrfb.org/ofd to start raising funds among friends, family and colleagues for the Food Bank.

Tour. Let us take you on a tour. Invite 5-10 people to join you.

Advocate. Contact us to learn about how you can help advocate to protect hunger programs in our country.

For More information or to make a donation go to www.rrfb.org